Tag Archives: The Build

The Build – Bolting the engine to the frame

The 396 Big Block is mounted to the engine stand. Now it’s all about fine-tuning and tweaking. Watch as the team attaches a chain around the engine to hoist it up, unbolt it from the stand, and drop it back down into the engine bay of the 1965 Chevy Malibu SS:

As they are getting ready to drop the engine in place, the team hits a tiny speed bump. The Hooker headers are a tight squeeze, so they were removed before dropping the engine down onto the frame.

65 Malibu Hooker headers

Also, as it is right now, the alternator would hit the bracket for the rack-and-pinion system that they have in place, so they will need to remove the alternator, do a little fabrication to the brackets and re-install it a little higher after the engine is in place.

65 Malibu alternator

Now that the motor is bolted in, with two bolts to the motor mounts, Paul Naber and the team will need to remove the bell housing so they can install the clutch. They will then put the bell housing back on and bolt the transmission up with the cross-member to place the engine where it needs to be.

65 Malibu transmission

As they prepare to install the Muncie transmission and attach it to the bell housing, the clutch is in place so the only thing left is setting it in and putting the bolts in. The driveshaft is lined up and put in place. Getting ready to move the rolling chassis onto the lift to re-install and fit the headers, and then do a little work on the alternator.

65 Malibu engine block

Now that the 396 big block engine has been bolted back onto the frame, watch as The Build team continues to put back together the 1965 Chevy Malibu restomod. Make it a priority to watch the other episodes on our YouTube channel, and follow the progress of our collector vehicle on our Facebook page too!

The Build – Painting the 1965 Chevy Malibu

Our experienced staff of collector car specialists at American Modern have sanded and primed the body of the 1965 Chevy Malibu, and now begin to paint her blue and silver.

The Build team is getting ready to paint the blue, including the body, jams, windshield surround, the dash, and anything else that’s going to be blue on the inside of the car. As you can see from the fluid up-and-down motion from Rob Baker, it is very important to stay at one frequency when painting the body of the vehicle.

Proper-paint-motion

Rob back tapes the line so the paint doesn’t bleed. The tape separates the silver from the underside of the body and the door jams from the blue on the top. The tape will provide a better view of what it will look like with a stripe and provide a gauge for the different colors.

1965-Chevy-Malibu-frame-primer

Now that Rick Drewry, Rick Hardbarger and Rob Baker have cut in the blue and masked it off, they are preparing to paint the silver and cut in the jams. After that, they’ll be ready for the clear coat.

Ami-G-painted-dash

The Build – Starting the 396 Big Block

Our team of collector car experts at American Modern have the final pieces in place on the 396 Big block Chevy engine, and are ready to turn the ignition and let those headers roar.

The team starts out by installing their new Hooker Headers onto the 396 big block. The plug wires are organized from longest to shortest to diagnose which wire goes to which spark plug. With the wire looms, you can easily organize and route the plug wires so that they are flush with the engine. The tach, oil pressure gauge, temperature gauge, and ignition are all wired up on the test stand. When you fire up an engine for the first time, you need to make sure it is done correctly to help with the break-in process. To do this, you need to run the engine for 20 minutes at 2,000 RPMs. Idling is not good for the camshaft on the initial start-up on a fresh engine.

396 big block engine

Now that the 396 big block engine has fired up, watch as The Build team continues to put back together the 1965 Chevy Malibu restomod. Make it a priority to watch the other episodes on our YouTube channel, and follow the progress of our collector vehicle on our Facebook page too!

The Build – Assembling A 396 Big Block Chevy

Have you been wanting to see the final assembly of a Chevy big block engine before it goes into a car?  You’re in luck. At American Modern, we have a 1965 Malibu SS 396 big block Chevy in its final stages of assembly. Watch it now:

Senior Collector Car Claims Specialist of American Modern Insurance Group, and host of  The Build, Rick Drewry, will install and seal the intake plugs to prevent leakage. With the gaskets in place, the team will be installing the water pump, oil filter mount and  oil filter onto the engine block of the ’65 Chevelle.

Rick points out that before you are going to put the fuel pump onto the block, you should make sure that the fuel pump push rod is up and out of the way, so you can avoid any problems with installation. Using a low mount alternator bracket, the alternator is mounted on the left hand side of the engine block.  Once your street avenger carburetor is placed, you can begin to line up your fuel lines. The high-torque mini starter is bolted up and ready to crank over the newly crafted, freshly restored Chevy big block engine.

396 big block Chevy engine

If you’ve been staying up to date with The Build, you probably know, the 1965 Chevy Malibu SS, named Ami G., has made huge strides to become the restomod she is today. Join our mailing list so you can stay current with all of her updates. Also, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel and Like us on Facebook to get the complete list of episodes of The Build.

The Build – Patching the Quarter Panel of a 65 Malibu

As you continue to take notes from us on how to properly restore a wrecked classic vehicle, more specifically a ‘65 Chevy Malibu SS, we will take you step-by-step into the process of patching the quarter panel. This thorough process has been recorded, along with many other videos, on American Modern’s show, “The Build”, seen here:

Rick Drewry, senior claims specialist for American Modern Insurance Group and host of ‘The Build’ , has already obtained patch panels for the rear quarter panel, and is now marking and tracing the patch panel in order to figure out how much they actually need. As they cut away the metal, they find that spray foam was used in a previous repair to fill in the bondo. This is an improvisation that is not recommended when restoring your collector car.

Rick and his team use some tools to cut out pieces to spot weld and replace with the patch panel. As they cut away, they find some rust on the outer wheel well that they’ll need to use the patch panel to replace. When your metal is rusted, you are not able to weld on top of it, so using a patch panel is an absolute must. They will use an attachment point for their patch panel after cutting off the unwanted rust. Less is more in this case.

The 1965 Chevy Malibu SS continues to show improvements from its original, wrecked state. You need to make it one of your top priorities to continue to follow up on all of our progress, and see what else is restored on ‘The Build’! You can find a full list of ‘The Build’ episodes on our YouTube Channel.

The Build – Patch Panel Repair on ’65 Malibu SS

Have you ever seen a smashed classic car in the junk yard and thought to yourself: “That Chevy’s got potential, I wonder what I could do to bring that beauty back to its prime?” We also know that it’s difficult to part ways with your classic ride, so the associates here at American Modern have decided to document the collector car restomod process with a 1965 Chevy Malibu SS. We’ve started a weekly online show – The Build – with a Chevy that took a detour into a brick wall. The series takes you step-by-step into the complete resto-mod project of this American classic.
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