Tag Archives: restomod

The Build – Buffing & sanding the firewall

In this episode, Rob Baker will take us through sanding the firewall and dashboard to rid the restomod of orange peel and/or dirt that may have gotten into the clear coat.

When they buff it out, it will provide that perfect showroom shine. Rob will use 2000 grit sandpaper just to give it a really smooth coat and eliminate any initial items in the clear coat, as the clear laid extremely well.

sanding the firewall

The buffer will now be used, after the 2000 grit sandpaper has completely sanded the firewall and dashboard. This will assist in bringing the shine back out with just a tiny amount of compound.

65 Chevy Malibu firewall buffing

When using the buffer, either the foam pads or the wool pads, be very careful around any edges or corners, as it will burn through.

65 Malibu Firewall - Buffing

Now that the firewall and dashboard have been sanded and buffed, watch as The Build team continues to put back together the 1965 Chevy Malibu restomod. Make sure to watch the other episodes on our YouTube channel, and follow the progress of our collector car on our Facebook page too!

The Build – Painting the 1965 Chevy Malibu

Our experienced staff of collector car specialists at American Modern have sanded and primed the body of the 1965 Chevy Malibu, and now begin to paint her blue and silver.

The Build team is getting ready to paint the blue, including the body, jams, windshield surround, the dash, and anything else that’s going to be blue on the inside of the car. As you can see from the fluid up-and-down motion from Rob Baker, it is very important to stay at one frequency when painting the body of the vehicle.

Proper-paint-motion

Rob back tapes the line so the paint doesn’t bleed. The tape separates the silver from the underside of the body and the door jams from the blue on the top. The tape will provide a better view of what it will look like with a stripe and provide a gauge for the different colors.

1965-Chevy-Malibu-frame-primer

Now that Rick Drewry, Rick Hardbarger and Rob Baker have cut in the blue and masked it off, they are preparing to paint the silver and cut in the jams. After that, they’ll be ready for the clear coat.

Ami-G-painted-dash

The Build – Painting the body panels

In the latest episode of American Modern Insurance Group’s The Build, the car has been sanded and the team is applying primer to the outside of the body of Ami G. (Named after after American Modern Insurance Group)

So now it’s time to get all of the edges on all of the body panels primed and ready to be painted in order for the restomod to be reassembled. The team will begin by painting the body panels silver.

primered-body-panels

They need to cut and paint in the body panels that are getting bolted onto the main body. So they’ll start by painting the silver first, then come back and paint the blue.

body-panels-painted-silver

After painting silver and cutting in all the parts, they’ll continue by painting what needs to be blue and cutting them in from that point.

silver-painted-body-panels

Taking the fine line across the body panels and cutting the blue line to split the line between the silver and the blue, the American Modern team will apply the blue paint before they finalize the clear coat between the two panels.

blue-cut-line-door-panel

We continue to thoroughly restore the 1965 Chevelle Malibu SS classic car on The Build. Be sure to stay up with The Build on our YouTube Channel, to see what else is restored. Also, continue to follow along with the collector car on our Facebook page.

Which do you prefer, stock or modified classic cars?

There’s an age-old argument about classic cars, keep them stock or modify them. Today, loads of different modified classic cars exist. From stock to modified, here are a number of different roads you can take. You can go with some slight modifications to make a collector car drive efficiently and more reliable, or go fairly extreme like we did with Ami G from The Build.

65 Chevy Malibu SS restomod

My advice is that if you find a “matching numbers” classic car, do what you can to keep it that way, by maintaining it as a survivor, or restoring it back to original specs. As far as long-term investment is concerned, you cannot go wrong with a documented original collector car. In most cases, the value will continue to increase over the years.

stock collector car

On the other hand, if you find a collector vehicle that does not have the original drive train or documentation, all rules are off. I suggest you build it into a custom hot rod:

• there are plenty of these types of cars available,
• it allows a lot of us to have fun in the collector car hobby and
• transform a classic into what we feel is ‘cool’!

modified classic cars

There are pros and cons to either direction you take, stock or modified. Are you someone who wants to own (and show off) a documented piece of history? Or do you want to own (and show off) a hot rod that is an extension of your personality?

Both ways are rewarding and fun. Which road do you take?

The Build – Starting the 396 Big Block

Our team of collector car experts at American Modern have the final pieces in place on the 396 Big block Chevy engine, and are ready to turn the ignition and let those headers roar.

The team starts out by installing their new Hooker Headers onto the 396 big block. The plug wires are organized from longest to shortest to diagnose which wire goes to which spark plug. With the wire looms, you can easily organize and route the plug wires so that they are flush with the engine. The tach, oil pressure gauge, temperature gauge, and ignition are all wired up on the test stand. When you fire up an engine for the first time, you need to make sure it is done correctly to help with the break-in process. To do this, you need to run the engine for 20 minutes at 2,000 RPMs. Idling is not good for the camshaft on the initial start-up on a fresh engine.

396 big block engine

Now that the 396 big block engine has fired up, watch as The Build team continues to put back together the 1965 Chevy Malibu restomod. Make it a priority to watch the other episodes on our YouTube channel, and follow the progress of our collector vehicle on our Facebook page too!

Cavalcade of Customs collector car show wrap up

The inaugural collector car show for Ami G. went off without a hitch this past weekend. The classic car show – Cavalcade of Customs, downtown Cincinnati – provided a great avenue for the 1965 Chevy Malibu to jump start her touring career. With countless hot rods, muscle cars and customs, Ami G. felt right at home.

Cavalcade of Customs collector car show

Of course, the people are what make these events so special. We met a lot of new faces as well as some familiar ones at our American Modern booth. Most people could not believe it was the same classic car. They were impressed that 100% of the repairs and restoration were done by American Modern employees, with the exception of the machine work on the engine.

American Modern collector car show

Multiple times, visitors to the booth asked if American Modern specializes in the business of restoring cars as well as selling insurance. I will take that as a compliment! One attendee, while looking over Ami G, said: “American Modern obviously knows what they are doing and truly cares about these old, classic cars and the hobby”.

Ami G. attracted a large assortment of new collector car enthusiasts and admirers at the Cavalcade of Customs, especially after hearing her story and seeing what she looked like 2 years ago. The associates at American Modern Insurance Group provided her with this new-found life. Everyone that had a hand in bringing her back should be very proud of themselves for restoring her into a beautiful restomod classic car.

collector-car-before-and-after

Ami G. is looking forward to her next car show. Stay tuned for more details!

The Build – Patching the Quarter Panel of a 65 Malibu

As you continue to take notes from us on how to properly restore a wrecked classic vehicle, more specifically a ‘65 Chevy Malibu SS, we will take you step-by-step into the process of patching the quarter panel. This thorough process has been recorded, along with many other videos, on American Modern’s show, “The Build”, seen here:

Rick Drewry, senior claims specialist for American Modern Insurance Group and host of ‘The Build’ , has already obtained patch panels for the rear quarter panel, and is now marking and tracing the patch panel in order to figure out how much they actually need. As they cut away the metal, they find that spray foam was used in a previous repair to fill in the bondo. This is an improvisation that is not recommended when restoring your collector car.

Rick and his team use some tools to cut out pieces to spot weld and replace with the patch panel. As they cut away, they find some rust on the outer wheel well that they’ll need to use the patch panel to replace. When your metal is rusted, you are not able to weld on top of it, so using a patch panel is an absolute must. They will use an attachment point for their patch panel after cutting off the unwanted rust. Less is more in this case.

The 1965 Chevy Malibu SS continues to show improvements from its original, wrecked state. You need to make it one of your top priorities to continue to follow up on all of our progress, and see what else is restored on ‘The Build’! You can find a full list of ‘The Build’ episodes on our YouTube Channel.

The Build – Patch Panel Repair on ’65 Malibu SS

Have you ever seen a smashed classic car in the junk yard and thought to yourself: “That Chevy’s got potential, I wonder what I could do to bring that beauty back to its prime?” We also know that it’s difficult to part ways with your classic ride, so the associates here at American Modern have decided to document the collector car restomod process with a 1965 Chevy Malibu SS. We’ve started a weekly online show – The Build – with a Chevy that took a detour into a brick wall. The series takes you step-by-step into the complete resto-mod project of this American classic.
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