Tag Archives: mustang

Barrett Jackson Auction 2016

The collector cars that show up at the Barrett Jackson Auction in Scottsdale each year can give you a good idea of what trends we will be seeing. It also, re-enforces my belief in the collector car hobby.

Barrett Jackson Auction hot rod

This year was big for the restomod Corvettes. I lost count of how many crossed the block this year. High end quality and style brought out some big money for these cars. However, compared to what is invested into building one of these cars, you could consider it a bargain. It is nothing to have $200,000 to $300,000 or more invested in one of these high-end builds. So buying a ’67 Corvette restomod for $125,000-$150,000 could be considered a steal! With the amount of restomod Corvettes on the market, prices should stay well below the cost to build one.

Barrett Jackson Auction 64 Corvette

Another trend that is continuing is the popularity of the cars from the 80’s and 90’s. They have found a place in the collector car market and continue to go up in value. So keep a lookout for a nice, fox body Mustang, Monte Carlo SS, Grand National, Iroc Z, GTA Trans Am, or Hurst Oldsmobile from the 80’s. It just might be worth more than what someone is willing to sell it for.

Barrett Jackson Auction Camaro

Lastly, the hot rod market is in transition. While the hobby is strong, it is aging rapidly. There will continue to be some high quality hot rods from the 1920’s, 30’s, and 40’s come available in the near future and unless a younger generation embraces it, the prices will continue to go down. Watching the collector car hobby is like watching the stock market. Except for me, it is a lot more fun!

Art of the Swap Meet

With car show season ramping up, a lot of us are looking forward to hitting a swap meet. The list of what you can find at a swap meet is endless. To the novice, here are a few tips that will help you at your first swap meet as a buyer:

1. Get there early (while they are setting up). You may not get the best deal but you may get the only grill for a ‘51 Hudson.

swap meet car parts

2. Prepare your wallet. Only take what you want to spend. You are dealing with cash transactions. Have enough to buy the things you’re looking for but don’t take too much. You might just end up with some junk you don’t need, and probably won’t be able to get rid of later.

sawp meet booth

3. Bring a vehicle with proper storing capacity. Don’t drive your Mustang or Firebird to a swap meet if you are looking for hoods, fenders, wheels, engine parts, etc.

swap meet fenders

4. Cart it. One of the best things you can do is pull a cart or wagon. When you end up buying something, it is easier to walk around and you don’t have to take repeated trips to the car.

swap meet classic car cart

5. Don’t be afraid to make an offer on something. It may have a price tag of $50, but you can offer $30. He may have been carrying that part around for years and is finally ready to cut it lose at any price. Or he may come back with a counter offer of $40. Then you can say, how about we split the difference and go $35?

swap meet transaction

6. Save impulse buys for the end of the swap meet. The worst thing you can do is buy something that you don’t really need, come across what you were actually looking for later and not have enough money to buy it!

large Chevy emblem - bow tie

7. Stay to the end! Some of the best deals happen at the end of a swap meet. People don’t want to load up all those parts, so they will cut a deal. Especially heavy parts. Make offers, you never know. Sometimes you can buy a bunch of parts at a bargain price. I don’t know how many times I have seen someone offer to buy everything that someone has left. That seller is usually ecstatic because that means they don’t have to load anything back up!

swap meet

Hopefully you will enjoy swap meets as much as I do. Haggling on price, searching for that long lost part for your classic car or that vintage sign for your garage, all while hanging out with car people. It doesn’t get much better than that!

swap meet engine valve covers

Will we be passing the torch or will the fire burn?

Will we be passing the torch or will the fire burn out with the next generation? Of course, I am talking about the collector car hobby and the passion for classic cars.

There are a couple schools of thought. One is that the fire will burn out because kids are not into cars, especially old ones. To a lot of younger people, a car is nothing more than something that gets them from place to place. And if that can be done by bike, bus, cab, or a parent, they don’t feel the need to have a car. With this mentality, old cars would seem to be the furthest thing from their minds!

The other thought is that the hobby is going to stay strong for several reasons:

1. Rat rods, low-budget customs and Rockabilly
It is very acceptable to have an old car that is unfinished and still show it off at car shows. In fact, patina is very desirable. The younger generation car owners have embraced the Rockabilly lifestyle. The best part is that it doesn’t take a year’s salary to get started in the hobby and these kids are having fun.

2. New cars are future hot rods.
In ten years, the Mustang GT, Challenger SRT8, and Camaro SS will be very affordable. You will be able to buy a car with more than 400 horsepower that gets more than 20 mpg for under $10,000.

3. Restomods
The popularity of restomods increases every year. Having a cool old car that has new technology built in, so it has the drivability and reliability of a new corvette really appeals to a lot of people, especially the younger generations.

4. Availability of old cars
There are a lot of old cars on the market. This could be a restoration project, restomod, survivor, hot rod, you name it. As new generations come into the hobby, they will have plenty to choose from based on their budget.

If you are in the collector car hobby, share your passion with the younger generations. Your kids, grandkids, and their friends. Take them for rides in the car. Take them to a car show with you. Have them help you work on the car. Let them drive your car (you with them of course). You are not sharing your car, you are sharing the passion!

Did SEMA glimpse into the future of classic cars?

I recently attended the 2014 SEMA Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. SEMA stands for Specialty Equipment Market Association. I define SEMA as the equivalent to the hot rodder’s paradise. The SEMA show fills the entire Las Vegas Convention Center, as well as several other surrounding areas. According to SEMA, the show attracts over 60,000 buyers and over 100,000 industry leaders from more than 100 countries.

Every SEMA Show exhibits new parts and tools on the market in the auto industry, and spells out what the collector vehicle and custom car market will become. In my opinion, this year has shown great trends in the hobby. The resto-mod and pro-touring segment of the collector car market has grown substantially over the past decade because of the intersection of new technology with old cars. Companies are creating better shop equipment to help both restorers and builders create award-winning show pieces at a new level of perfection.

There were two obvious trends that I noticed at this years’ SEMA show.

1 – Square-bodied C10 custom trucks.  Pro-touring, custom, and even stock C10 trucks from the 60’s, 70’s and early 80’s are picking up a lot of steam.  There is a demand for these trucks, both in stock trim and multiple modified stages.  As demand grows for these C10 trucks, so will the value.

C10 Custom Trucks at SEMA

2 – Hot rodding is alive and well with new cars.  From the Ford Mustang GT500, to the Chevy Camaro ZL1, the Dodge Charger & Challenger Hellcat, car manufacturers are taking performance to a whole new level.   This is happening because of demand.  A consumer is looking for both reliability and style, along with an extreme amount of horsepower. The muscle car craze of the 60’s era exploded because of these same interests. The aftermarket industry has embraced these cars and manufacture just about anything you could want to make these new cars faster, lighter, and better looking.

Camaro-Mustang-Challenger at SEMA

You can learn a lot by attending a show like SEMA.  This year I learned that the collector car hobby is alive and well. The future continues to look bright with all of the new cars coming to the market!