The Build – Assembling a 396 Big Block – Part 2

In the previous episode, you watched the team start the big block Chevy assembly process. Paul Naber, Collector Car Claims Adjuster at American Modern Insurance Group, explains that they have cut down the metal fuel line to the proper length so that it will run from the mechanical fuel pump to the carburetor. Watch as the team is one step closer to getting the 396 big block fired up and running:

Rick Drewry, Sr. Collector Car Claims Specialist at American Modern, proceeds to put the crank pulley on, where a single belt will connect the alternator single groove crank pulley  to the alternator. Next in line is the valve covers that were voted on by  our Facebook followers on our Collector Car Facebook page.

Baldwin Motion Style valve covers

Paul proceeds to add an engine break-in additive to the oil. When you start your engine for the first time after it is rebuilt, the break-in additive will help prevent excessive wear to all of the engine internals.

The next phase of assembling for our 396 big block Chevy is installing the thermostat,  and thermostat housing. This thermostat housing  comes with an o-ring on the bottom for sealing instead of a gasket.

The engine is set to top dead center, the distributor is then dropped in with the rotor button pointing to the number one cylinder. Once the engine fires up, you can adjust the timing to get it exactly where you want it. Moving the big block over to the break-in stand, the flywheel is installed so that  the starter can engage with the flywheel to turn the engine  over.

Be sure to keep up with all of the updates on The Build, as the 1965 Chevy Malibu SS continues to make big steps to become the car she is today. Stay tuned with Ami G. by joining our mailing list and Liking us on Facebook. You can also find a full list of The Build episodes by subscribing to our YouTube channel.


Did SEMA glimpse into the future of classic cars?

I recently attended the 2014 SEMA Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. SEMA stands for Specialty Equipment Market Association. I define SEMA as the equivalent to the hot rodder’s paradise. The SEMA show fills the entire Las Vegas Convention Center, as well as several other surrounding areas. According to SEMA, the show attracts over 60,000 buyers and over 100,000 industry leaders from more than 100 countries.

Every SEMA Show exhibits new parts and tools on the market in the auto industry, and spells out what the collector vehicle and custom car market will become. In my opinion, this year has shown great trends in the hobby. The resto-mod and pro-touring segment of the collector car market has grown substantially over the past decade because of the intersection of new technology with old cars. Companies are creating better shop equipment to help both restorers and builders create award-winning show pieces at a new level of perfection.

There were two obvious trends that I noticed at this years’ SEMA show.

1 – Square-bodied C10 custom trucks.  Pro-touring, custom, and even stock C10 trucks from the 60’s, 70’s and early 80’s are picking up a lot of steam.  There is a demand for these trucks, both in stock trim and multiple modified stages.  As demand grows for these C10 trucks, so will the value.

C10 Custom Trucks at SEMA

2 – Hot rodding is alive and well with new cars.  From the Ford Mustang GT500, to the Chevy Camaro ZL1, the Dodge Charger & Challenger Hellcat, car manufacturers are taking performance to a whole new level.   This is happening because of demand.  A consumer is looking for both reliability and style, along with an extreme amount of horsepower. The muscle car craze of the 60’s era exploded because of these same interests. The aftermarket industry has embraced these cars and manufacture just about anything you could want to make these new cars faster, lighter, and better looking.

Camaro-Mustang-Challenger at SEMA

You can learn a lot by attending a show like SEMA.  This year I learned that the collector car hobby is alive and well. The future continues to look bright with all of the new cars coming to the market!

The Build – Assembling A 396 Big Block Chevy

Have you been wanting to see the final assembly of a Chevy big block engine before it goes into a car?  You’re in luck. At American Modern, we have a 1965 Malibu SS 396 big block Chevy in its final stages of assembly. Watch it now:

Senior Collector Car Claims Specialist of American Modern Insurance Group, and host of  The Build, Rick Drewry, will install and seal the intake plugs to prevent leakage. With the gaskets in place, the team will be installing the water pump, oil filter mount and  oil filter onto the engine block of the ’65 Chevelle.

Rick points out that before you are going to put the fuel pump onto the block, you should make sure that the fuel pump push rod is up and out of the way, so you can avoid any problems with installation. Using a low mount alternator bracket, the alternator is mounted on the left hand side of the engine block.  Once your street avenger carburetor is placed, you can begin to line up your fuel lines. The high-torque mini starter is bolted up and ready to crank over the newly crafted, freshly restored Chevy big block engine.

396 big block Chevy engine

If you’ve been staying up to date with The Build, you probably know, the 1965 Chevy Malibu SS, named Ami G., has made huge strides to become the restomod she is today. Join our mailing list so you can stay current with all of her updates. Also, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel and Like us on Facebook to get the complete list of episodes of The Build.