Rick’s Collector Car Tips – Patina is an art form

Cars and trucks with patina continue to grow in popularity. Per Wikipedia, patina refers to accumulated changes in surface texture and color that result from normal use of an object.   Hot rodding adds style to the patina trend. Faded paint, surface rust, and exposed primer are all part of the allure.

Instead of having a $10,000-$20,000 custom paint job, the money is spent on performance, handling, and reliability.

photo courtesy of Car-from-UK.com

How do you find a classic car with the right amount of patina? Sometimes it’s not that easy. You need to find a car or truck that is weathered but not completely deteriorated.  If that can’t be found with the type of  vehicle you want, make your own patina. Creating it consists of sanding down and dulling the paint, creating weathered looking door lettering, and other tactics.   There are a lot of videos and articles out there to help you accomplish this look.

patina pick-up truck

Some of these patina cars and trucks are sold for a significant amount of money.   It’s all about what is cool.  And right now, a well-done patina hot rod is bringing the same passion as a full-blown custom car.

patina coupe

What is your take?   Do you like them?  Would you want to build or own one?   What is the coolest patina car you have seen? Share it on our Facebook page!

patina pickup truck

Rick’s Collector Car Tips – What is your winter project?

While winter may not be the ideal time for cruising, it does offer a 5-month window of time to really get things done. But as you know, a classic car or hot rod is never officially “done.” Even if it looks complete, there’s always something to tweak, improve, or rebuild.

Firewall repair on 65 Malibu

Here are a few projects I’ll be working on in my garage this winter:

  •  a ‘53 Chevy that I am transitioning into my daily drive
  •  two cars that I am working on with my kids
  •  and I’m always doing things with my ‘64 and ‘69 GTOs

 

To me, a project car is just as cool to admire as one that’s been fully restored. I know it’s tough to find the time and energy, but let’s see if we can get some stuff done this winter!  

 Rear fender body work 65 Malibu

What projects do you have going on and what are some of your goals for winter? We want to hear from you! And if you have a picture of your project, share it with us on our Facebook page.

Rick’s Collector Car Tips – Collector Car Auctions

 

I work a number of collector car auctions. I was recently at the Barrett-Jackson Auction in Las Vegas. Going to a car auction is a learning opportunity for me. I always start by walking through and looking the cars over.


On stock cars, I look for three characteristics:

— Condition

— Originality

— Documentation

Chevy Corvette


On modified cars, I look for five characteristics:

—  Condition

— Quality of workmanship with the body and paint

— Customization done

— Drive train

— Curb appeal

'65 Chevy Malibu SS


If a collector car sold for lower than what you thought it should, there’s a good reason why. Sometimes you’ll encounter a bidding duel on the auction floor between two people that absolutely must have the car, which will build up the cost above average, but that is only on occasion. Every once in a while a car will sell for lower than you would have estimated because the bidder that may have wanted that particular car was not at the auction that day to make a bid.

For example, there’s a Ford collector vehicle for auction, and every person in the audience is a Chevy fan, besides you. So, hypothetically, they will not be bidding on the Ford. It takes two people to up the bid price, so if you are the only Ford fan, you’re going to be able to acquire that car for less than you anticipated because no one else will be battling you for the collector car.

Watching the auctions on television can be entertaining, but nothing compares to actually being at the auction, looking at all the beautiful cars up close and watching them cross the block. If you have never been to a collector car auction, it is time to put that on your bucket list!


Rick’s Collector Car Tips – 6 Tips to Winterize your Classic Vehicle

Here are six great suggestions for preparing and adapting your classic vehicle for storage during the cold, winter months:


Fuel — Fill up your gas tank and mix fuel stabilizer in with the gas. Run or drive the car with the fuel stabilizer until it is up to temperature. This way the stabilized fuel has been distributed throughout your entire fuel system.


American Modern classic vehicle tire pictureTires — Check your tire pressure. Treat the tires on both the outside and the inside of your classic vehicle to prevent the tires from drying out. Jack up the car and put it on jack stands to avoid flat spots on the tires.


Paint — Protect your car from small scratches by applying a good coat of wax before you cover it up.


American Modern classic vehicle interior pictureInterior — Detail the interior so you start off the next season with a clean car. Treat the leather, vinyl, and dash.


Battery — Use a battery tender. Even if it holds a charge through the winter, if you do not use a battery tender, it will shorten the life of your battery significantly.


American Modern collector vehicle garage pictureGarage Area — Moisture is your enemy. Make sure the car is stored in a dry environment. A dehumidifier in the garage helps. Also, the heat from a light bulb or the air movement of a very small fan under the car will help reduce the moisture build up under the cover. Always use a breathable car cover to allow moisture to escape.


Rick’s Collector Car Tips – Starting The Collector Car Hobby

How Do I Get Into The Collector Car Hobby?

Rick Drewry, Senior Claims Specialist at American Modern Insurance Group, has been approached many times at car shows with the specific question: “How do I start the collector car hobby?” Rick states that anyone can get into the collector vehicle hobby, it’s just a matter of keeping these three tips in mind when beginning the collector car shopping process:

• Buy a car that starts up and drives. Do not buy a project car the first time around. You’ll spend too much time and money attempting to get the car to show quality that you will never truly enjoy the car. A drivable classic car can participate in car shows and cruise-ins. Car guys will ask you what your plans and expectations are as well, so it’s a great conversation starter.

American Modern collector car insurance

• Go for the lower trim/performance option. Don’t hold out on a Pontiac GTO, go get a Tempest or a LeMans instead. A simple engine swap makes these virtually the same collector vehicle. The same rule applies with a Chevy Camaro over a Z28 or Plymouth Duster. Get the slant-six instead of a 340 engine.

American Modern collector car insurance

• Consider less mainstream collector cars. Camaro, Chevelle, and Mustang are the popular models, but the station wagons from the 50’s – 70’s make for great classic cars. From the Oldsmobile Delta 88s, to the Ford LTD and Chrysler 300, these can make for sweet rides. Entry-level cars like the Vega, Corvair, Pinto and Maverick are also recommended. Make sure to do your homework before making that car purchase, and ask for help if necessary. Once you obtain your first collector car, you’ll wonder why you waited this long to buy one! Have Fun!

Rick’s Collector Car Tips – What is the best way to maintain your collector car?

If you’re looking for some great maintenance tips for your classic vehicle, look no further. Proper maintenance of your collector vehicle is extremely important, and you need to be sure to keep these insightful tips in mind before you decide to take your collector car out for a joy ride. Rick Drewry, senior claims specialist at American Modern, has a passion for collector vehicles and has been working on them for 30 years, since he was a child in his dad’s shop. He shares some tips with you on preventative maintenance in this video:

You may not know this, but most of the things you tend to forget are extremely minor, but could could cause an amazing amount of damage.

The highlights include a 30 cent distributor hose that can fly off the distributor and spray fuel all over your engine bay, causing an extremely damaging fire. Make sure your wiring is tucked away nicely, not resting on the exhaust manifold or header, as the heat under the hood will cause them to become brittle after time. Replace the wires and you will cut down on losses on your classic car in the future.

collector car maintenance

American Modern also hosts a series on a complete restomod of a 1965 Chevy Malibu SS on YouTube, titled ‘The Build’. Make sure you check out all of the episodes to learn about some of the proper ways to restore a wrecked classic vehicle.