1933 Lincoln KB Convertible Victoria

If you talk to Lincoln historians, many feel that the 1933 Lincoln KB may have been the best Lincoln ever produced. With the introduction of Cadillac’s V-12 and V-16 luxury cars, it quickly became apparent to Henry Leland that the multi-cylinder race was on. He founded Lincoln on the premise of producing cars without compromise. This 1933 KB is a stellar example of Leland’s finest engineering.

  • 448-cu. in. L-head V-12 engine,
  • 150 HP, 3-speed manual transmission,
  • longitudinal leaf spring suspension,
  • power disc brakes,
  • 145” wheelbase

Lincoln offered true custom-built cars during this time period, but the company also placed stock orders — sometimes 50 at a time — to a multitude of premiere coach-builders like Judkins, Murphy, Dietrich and Brunn. This allowed customers the luxury of a coach-built auto with the option to customize their vehicles without a lengthy wait for delivery.

AMIG 1933 Lincoln pic 1

KB 2532 features what many consider the most attractive of all of those coach-built bodies: Brunn’s striking Convertible Victoria. With its low windshield, clean top lines and sweeping fenders, the car is a masterpiece of classic era design. Naturally, the paint exudes Wall Street swank, alternating between subdued burgundy and tan. The bodywork is excellent and the finishes have been buffed to the kind of liquid-smooth shine that’ll be right at home sitting on any show field.

AMIG 1933 Lincoln pic 2 int

KB 2532 was long owned by noted Lincoln collector Roy Warshawsky of J.C. Whitney fame. The big Victoria was one of his all-time favorite pieces, remaining in his personal collection until his death. Ohio collector Richard Scott then restored the car and completed a 1,000-mile CCCA CARavan through the Pacific Northwest. When Scott sold KB 2532, it had a stint in one of America’s preeminent Midwest automotive museums, where it earned a CCCA Senior 100 Point Award.

Lincoln 2

This Victoria’s 448-cubic inch V12 engine is nothing short of an engineering masterpiece with seven main bearings, fork and blade connecting rods and dual cylinder blocks. Hand-built and very expensive to produce, the 150-horsepower mill was so expensive to manufacture that it would be promptly replaced by a more conventional design, making 1933 the last year for the ultimate Lincoln.

Lincoln 1

The chassis is clean and correct. It features solid front and live rear axles, longitudinal leaf springs and 4-wheel vacuum servo-assisted drum brakes. The 1933 model also received a reinforced frame, an adjustable vacuum booster, thermostatic shock absorbers and a new 3-speed transmission.

Inside, lovely wood-topped door panels join the elegant burgundy carpet. Pleated and stainless-trimmed seats serve as the car’s soft points. The dash and steering wheel are restored original pieces with period-correct knobs, gauges and controls. Overall, this Lincoln emphasizes the kind of secure, luxurious coddling that most showroom-fresh metal lost a long time ago.

’32 and ‘33 Lincolns are regarded as some of the finest and most undervalued cars of their era. This Victoria is one of just 533 KBs assembled. It is an elegant, luxurious and exceptionally stylish reminder of the incredible engineering prowess of one of the world’s most storied automotive franchises.

1927 Stutz Vertical Eight Speedster

Harry C. Stutz is one of the great automotive pioneers of the last century, mentioned among notables like Bugatti, Miller and Duesenberg. One of his first forays into automobile manufacture was the design of an engine for the American Motor Car Company’s Underslung model.

  •  298.6-cu. in. SOHC inline eight-cylinder engine,
  • 95 HP,
  • three-speed manual transmission,
  • solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs
  • a 131” wheelbase.

AMIG 1927 Stutz 2 eng

Stutz formed the Ideal Motor Company in 1911 and immediately saw the importance of marketing his automobiles through racing. The very first car that left the Indianapolis plant was delivered straight to the track to compete in the Indianapolis 500, finishing 11th with no mechanical issues or failures and earning the slogan, “The Car That Made Good in a Day.”  One year later, the then-renamed Stutz Motor Company’s cars were seen as some of the finest money could buy.

AMIG 1927 Stutz 1
 

In 1926, engineer Frederic Moscovics developed the “Safety Stutz” chassis with a double drop that gave a low center of gravity, excellent handling and a rakish look. Four-wheel hydraulic brakes were fitted, as well as a worm-drive rear axle. The new “Vertical Eight” straight-8 engine had a single overhead camshaft driven by a link-belt chain and featured a twin-plug ignition. It was smooth, powerful and quiet.

 

In 1927, a Vertical Eight-equipped model AA set a 24-hour speed record, averaging 68 mph over 24 hours and Stutz backed that up in 1928 when its vehicle finished second to only to the Bentley Boys’ entry at the legendary 24 Hours of LeMans race.

 

This magnificent Stutz AA Black Hawk Vertical Eight featured a beautiful, sporting boat-tail speedster body — the first American car with that style of coachwork. This example still wears its original ID tag, displaying number AAS570575. It has been carefully restored to exacting standards and is ready for touring or show.

 

The body is finished in a subtle two-tone light beige / tan, which is set off by dark red painted wheels and a red cockpit.  Minimalist cycle fenders with fabric mud guards up front, simple alloy step plates and dual side mounts complete the look. The paint finishes and panel fit are excellent. Chrome trim and detailing highlight the quality of the car. The body is styled with drum headlights, wind wings, dual tail lights and, of course, the wonderful Stutz mascot on the radiator.

 

Inside the period cabin, newer red upholstery is in excellent condition with matching red carpeting. The simple dash features comprehensive instrumentation and a fantastic wood steering wheel mounted on a chrome column. For touring, luggage can be stowed either via the side mounted golf club door or the small trunk in the rear of the body.

Stutz 1
 

The Vertical Eight engine is a strong runner and has been very nicely detailed. It is striking, with a beige painted block and an evocative red cam cover. Thanks to the overhead cam and dual ignition, the 298-cubic inch mill is good for a strong 95 horsepower. This particular example also wears a period Wall Oil Rectifier — an early oil filtration device that heats the oil to rid it of unwanted moisture and fuel. The engine bay of this Stutz is a fascinating lesson in clever engineering and fine restoration work.

 
Stutz 2

Moscovics-era “Safety Stutz” cars are well-renowned for their robust performance and excellent handling. They remain highly collectible. The example we photographed today has been lovingly restored and invites regular use as a sporty touring companion for CCCA events, or as an entry to nearly any show field in the world.

1966 Mercedes-Benz 230SL Convertible

First introduced to the world at the 1963 Geneva Motor Show, the Mercedes-Benz W113 — better known as the 230 SL — certainly had big shoes to fill. It was slated to be the replacement for both the iconic 300 SL and the smaller 190SL. As it turned out, the 230SL wasn’t so much a replacement as it was a significant change in direction for the Super Light line, bringing the American market an emphasis on luxury while retaining an essential sportiness — something lead engineer Fritz Nallinger called “motoring happiness.”

  •  2.3-liter overhead,
  • cam inline,
  • fuel-injected 6-cylinder engine,
  • 150 HP,
  • 4-speed manual gearbox,
  • double-wishbone front suspension,
  • transverse spring rear axle,
  • 94.5” wheelbase

 

1966 Mercedes engine block

The fresh new 230SL was a sales success, immediately doubling the best results of the previous 190SL. It proved to be a landmark design with undeniable collector appeal.

1966 Mercedes 230SL right side

Perhaps the most distinctive new feature was the removable hardtop designed by Paul Bracq, which had a slightly concave center section and raised edges — a clever touch that effectively improved cabin visibility and created much easier access. It also gave the car a distinct look, earning the 230SL its familiar nickname, the “Pagoda.”

1966 Mercedes 230SL left side

The 230 continued the Mercedes-Benz tradition of impeccable build quality. Neither extravagant nor overly aggressive, the clean, new styling was elegantly proportioned. Collectors enjoy the attention these cars get. The easy availability of parts and a well-established and enthusiastic community of fellow Mercedes-Benz owners open up a world of collector car opportunities to the new owner.

MB 1

Power is provided by the robust and reliable fuel-injected straight-six engine installed at the factory, mated to a supple and fully-synchro 4-speed manual transmission. The W113 was a very early adapter of safety considerations like planned deformation zones to protect the passengers and the lack of any sharp edges that began in the design stages. The engine in this example is silky smooth with good power delivery — the total package is tight and handles well. Top speed is listed as 125 MPH, thanks to a high compression head and new 6-nozzle Bosch fuel injection, and it’s equipped with front disc brakes and power-assisted rear drums.

AMIG 1966 MB 230SL pic 2 int

This highly presentable 230 SL is, apart from a repaint in period correct Grey Beige, largely original and wearing its miles gracefully. It was originally sold at Worldwide Motors in Indianapolis, Indiana — included in the sale are many original documents, including instructions for the original Becker radio, which is still in the car.  The shipping invoice, warranty papers and service records are included, in addition to both the hard and soft tops. The original turquoise leather upholstery and carpets are in good condition and bespeak the careful use this car has received.

1936 Cord 810 Cabriolet

The 1936 Cord 810 was a sharp break from traditional automotive styling, with equally innovative mechanicals.  Envisioned as a sporty middle ground between the massive Duesenberg and the traditional Auburn, the debut of the “New Cord” at the November 1935 New York Auto Show was remarkable, with photos showing the joyful madness of the crowd. Many individuals reportedly stood on roofs of other cars, just to catch a glimpse.

  • 288-cu. in. L-head V-8 engine,
  • 125 HP,
  • four-speed pre-selector manual transmission,
  • independent front suspension,
  • rear semi-elliptic suspension with leaf springs and
  • four-wheel hydraulic brakes,
  • 125” wheelbase

AMIG 1936 Cord 810 2 eng
For an industry in which “totally new” was a worn-out catchphrase, the Cord 810 was truly radical. The Gordon Buehrig design boasted previously unheard-of advancements, such as unitary construction, an underslung floor, completely hidden door hinges and no running boards. Sleek and low, it was known as the “coffin nose” Cord because it lacked a traditional upright radiator. With front-wheel drive and a four-speed transmission (shifting was accomplished by pressing a European-style pre-selector switch on the steering column), it was a glimpse into the future of automotive design.

 

Cord ads sang the praises of the new car’s power, handling prowess and graceful beauty. Buyers initially responded in droves, but it was all for naught — production delays and the Depression doomed the Cord after only two short years of production. Of the four original body styles, the most treasured and sought-after is the two-passenger cabriolet, known to many enthusiasts as the “Sportsman.”

 

Cord 810 2

The Cabriolet photographed today was acquired in 1971 by its present owner — a long-term Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club member — and it held the honor of being his first ACD antique car. The car was found behind an old gas station in North Portland.

 

It was restored over a period of several years with the assistance of respected Cord specialists in the Pacific Northwest including, most prominently, the late Wayne Weihermiller, whose skill with the Cord’s notoriously finicky transmission was legendary. Weihermiller carefully rebuilt the transmission and the instrumentation.

Cord 810 1
The car was also fitted with improved front axle U-joints that were developed by LeeRoy Richardson, allowing it to be comfortably and reliably driven for long distances. The Richardson conversion is fully accepted by Cord enthusiasts as a welcome improvement in safety and reliability and are a highly desirable feature.

 

The car’s details are authentic throughout. The older restoration holds up nicely. The vehicle features an original bronze windshield frame (which is highly preferable to later re-castings), a correct accessory ashtray and an original, working radio.
AMIG 1936 Cord 810 1

Although the original engine (FB 1742) was changed out years ago, the original serial number tag remains on the car. Most importantly, because a correct 810 engine was installed, the substitution does not affect the ability to submit it for ACD Club certification by the new owner. The car is listed as an authentic cabriolet in both of Josh B. Malks’ standard references on the model: Cord Complete and The Timeless Classic.

 

The owner notes that the car is a strong driver, still shifts well after some recent sorting and recently completed a 150-mile tour. This car has only been shown at a few local events and concours over the years, making it an ideal ACD Club or CCCA tour car.  A high-quality 810 like this would assuredly be welcomed into nearly any classic car event. It demonstrates the best of early design and engineering.

 

 

1955 Chevrolet 3100 5-Window Pickup Truck

1955 was a pivotal and important year for Chevrolet. Not only did their passenger car lineup receive fresh styling that the public embraced immediately, their trucks received similar treatment as well. Series One trucks were actually introduced in the fall of 1954 and the new-look trucks set the pace for a great year for Chevrolet.

1955 Chevy  3100 Pickup

  •  235-cu. in. inline 6-cylinder engine,
  • 123hp,
  • 3-speed manual transmission,
  • independent front suspension with rear leaf springs,
  • 114” wheelbase

 

1955 Chevrolet engine

Attitudes about trucks were changing fast in the 1950s. Lots of people used them for double-duty – while it was tough enough to be a work truck during the day, the new Chevrolet was also stylish and comfortable enough for everyday personal transportation. Known as the Task Force Series, the 3100s proved that there was a market for slick pickups. Chevrolet was one of the first makers to take advantage of that demand.

 

The 1955 Series 3100‘s design was revolutionary from the cab forward. Truck buyers jumped at the chance to own one. Inspired by passenger car design, it had a streamlined, wrap-around, one-piece windshield. It featured full corner windows and a larger rear window.

1955 Chevy Pickup interior

The new trucks featured a lower hood and a chrome grille that emulated passenger cars. Jutting forward from the sculptured fenders and door surfaces, car-inspired headlamps with chrome rings helped to create an all-new, racy profile. The doors were wider and taller for easy entry. A new fresh-air heater / defroster system pulled air through the cabin and out vents at the rear of the cab. The dash design was beautiful and thoroughly modern, as was the sleek, car-like steering wheel.

 

In 2008, this fine example was restored in original two-tone green and white livery. It shows excellent panel fit and a lovely shine. It is decked out with the accessory chrome package, wide whitewalls, chrome wheel covers, a factory windshield visor, side-mounted spare and a correct, new oak bed with matching oak side rails.

 

The entire interior appears original, from the factory AM radio and original vinyl upholstery, right down to the original rubber floor covering. Even the original pedals are only lightly worn, indicating the fine and highly original nature of the truck. This and other 5-window cabs are highly desirable for their advanced styling with flawless visibility on all four corners.

 

Under the hood, the original inline six engine is clean and quiet, with a tidy engine bay and correct appearance. The truck starts easily, idles quietly, and pulls with surprising torque. The original 3-speed column shifter makes this truck very easy to drive.

 

Modern Chevy vehicles like the SSR and HHR both lean heavily on these redesigned 3100 trucks for their inspiration and it’s no wonder — ’50s-era pickup trucks have always had a loyal following. But they are often the subject of performance and cosmetic modifications, so today it can be difficult to find quality pickups of the era that are restored to their correct configuration.

 

Since only 5,220 were reportedly produced in the 1955 model year, this beautifully restored 5-window would make a fine addition to any Chevrolet collection.

1973 Porsche 911S Coupe

Early Porsche 911 ’s embody a combination that is rare among collector cars today. They have both unparalleled driveability and usability, especially when compared with other cars of the same vintage, but are also fully connected to an earlier era. There is a certain wholeness, cohesiveness, and agility that is only evident when they are driven, and it is no surprise that they have a fanatical following. They are simply a blast to drive, with the advantage of solid investment potential.

1973 Porsche - Front passenger side

  • 2.4 liter,
  • 6 cylinder,
  • horizontally opposed air-cooled boxer engine,
  • 190 HP,
  • 915-5 speed manual gearbox,
  • Bosch fuel injection,
  • independent front suspension on transverse links,
  • rear independent suspension on lateral links and transverse,
  • torsion bars,
  • 89.3” wheelbase

 

The 911S was introduced as a better equipped and more powerful version of the standard 911. It featured engine modifications that resulted in 30 extra horsepower, and in addition, the chassis was modified and bigger brakes were installed. An extra five pounds were saved from each corner of the car by using Fuchs alloy wheels. 911S models for 1973 gained a discreet spoiler under the front bumper to improve high-speed stability. With the cars weighing only 2,315 pounds, these are often regarded as the best classic mainstream 911’s ever, as well as holding the crown for being the longest running production sports car ever.

1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II Hardtop Coupe

The Lincoln Continental Mark II was the elite automobile of the 1950’s rich and famous: Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Louie Prima, Dwight Eisenhower, Nelson Rockefeller, the Shah of Iran, and many other celebrities proudly owned and drove them.

1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II front

Debuting on October 5, 1955, the Continental Mark II carried a price tag of $10,000 – fifty percent more than the most costly Cadillac of the same year. With a long hood, short deck, and a trunk sculpted to hold the “continental” spare in a semi-upright position, the new Conti captured the proportions and sporty yet elegant spirit of its handsome predecessor, and it succeeded in becoming the “modern classic” that Ford officials had hoped for.

  • 368 ci overhead valve V-8 engine,
  • 285 HP,
  • three-speed Turbo Drive automatic transmission,
  • coil springs front and semi-elliptic leaf type rear,
  • four-wheel power assist hydraulic brakes 126” wheelbase

1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II  engine

The build quality for the Continental Mark II was impeccable, rivaling the careful construction lavished on cars like Rolls Royce. For instance, exterior chrome was subjected to a ten day salt spray test, and transmissions were tested prior to being attached to engines, and then the completed units were subjected to a rigorous dynamometer test. Front sheet metal was fitted to the body before final assembly and painting, and only lacquer was used in the painting process. Fourteen quality control stations were placed in the assembly plant at critical stages. When completed, each car was, of course, exhaustively road tested before release for delivery.

1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II interior

Much of the car was assembled by hand and with its high price and slow-moving production line, the Mark II was never expected to be a high-volume moneymaker for Ford, but it was instead intended to be the flagship for Lincoln’s re-entry into the luxury car field. It likely never made a penny for the company but succeeded admirably in establishing Lincoln in the top rank of U.S. made cars once again. Production for 1956 totaled only 1,325 cars, and all were hand built. Today the Continental Mark II has been designated a Milestone Car by the Milestone Car Society.

1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II  rear

Donning its original White exterior with the factory black leather interior, this example carries all of the standard amenities including power seats, power windows, power steering, power locks, factory tachometer and power brakes to further enhance the touring experience in this fine automobile. In addition, the only option available, air conditioning, was thankfully ordered, and it works perfectly. The original 285 HP engine and transmission power the Mark II to achieve modern highway speeds, and the comfortable cockpit is every bit the equal to the finest cars Europe ever offered. With only two years of total production, the Mark II instantly became a car in high demand and that demand has risen steadily to this day.

1954 Jaguar XK 120

The Jaguar XK 120 was introduced at the October 1948 London Earls Court Motor Show as a design exercise and showpiece for the magnificent new XK engine. This was the first British auto show in nearly 10 years due to the intervention of war, and although money was still tight and rationing was still in force, public interest was high. Chief Jaguar stylist William Lyons talent was more than justified as his new roadster design was the sensation of the show and the press acclaim was overwhelming and immediate. Sensing the opportunity and the promotional value of competition, Lyons immediately set about promoting the prototype car through racing and speed events, even before he produced and printed sales brochures and announced immediate production plans.

1954 Jaguar XK 120

  • 3442cc in-line six-cylinder dual overhead cam engine,
  • 160 HP,
  • four-speed manual gearbox,
  • Torsion-bar independent front suspension with anti-roll bar,
  • rear live axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs,
  • 102” wheelbase

 

1954 Jaguar XK 120

The press pundits were skeptical that the new Jaguar could achieve the claimed top speed of 120 mph as the model name suggested, and they also were doubtful that the car could be sold successfully for the suggested $4,000. Lyons had enough orders on his books to start a limited production line, hand-building the cars in the classic tradition of alloy body over a wood frame, and in the meantime set about the business of convincing the world that his new car could do everything he said it could and more. He built another three pre-production cars, painted them red, white and blue, and sent them to Silverstone for the prestigious production car event, which they won in great style coming in First, Second, and Fourth.

1954 Jaguar XK 120

In May 1950, with the world motoring press watched a production XK 120 with a smaller windscreen hurtle down the motorway in Jabbeke, Belgium at over 132 mph, and history was in the making. The news went out and within weeks orders started to pour in. Just 240 Alloy bodied XKs were built before the sheer volume of the orders demanded that production change to pressed steel panels to speed up the assembly process. Lyons had justified his faith in his new XK engine and his engineers and staff had built a great car around it.

1954 Jaguar XK 120

1954 was the final year of XK 120 production, and this fine Roadster was long part of the esteemed John O’Quinn collection. The restoration was obviously performed on a straight, rust-free car, as the panel fit and gaps are excellent. Finished in classic white, this superb XK 120 Roadster sports the original dash panel with its correct brass plaque and period instruments. The seats are fine black leather, and with the correct carpets and door panels in place, everything looks clean and proper inside. Take a good look underneath as well, and you’ll see a clean and properly prepared undercarriage. The boot offers the correct mat, spare wheel, and has a full original tool roll and jack, and throughout, it’s a lovely presentation of a significant early Jaguar.

1955 Jaguar D-Type

When the Jaguar D-Type debuted at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans, it finished a narrow 2nd to a 4.9-liter Ferrari V-12. A year later, a D-Type with a long-nosed factory body and a revised motor won the race outright. Although Jaguar retired from racing after the 1956 season, the D-Type continued to flourish in private hands, winning Le Mans in 1956 and 1957 for the Ecurie Ecosse. Although not necessarily well-suited to every type of course, the D-Type proved to be extremely effective on properly surfaced endurance circuits, and it remains one of the most important Le Mans race cars ever built, holding a special place in Coventry lore.

Chassis XKD 530 offers a tale that is surely as intricate and fascinating as any surviving D-Type. This car, one of the fifty-four examples produced for privateer customers, was dispatched from the factory on February 13, 1956, and it was finished in British Racing Green, as confirmed by its Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate. The car was retailed through Finnish Jaguar dealer S.M.K. and delivered in April 1956 to Curt Lincoln, of Helsinki, a tennis player on Finland’s Davis Cup team who was known to the racing world for his exploits in F3 midget cars, and a Jaguar C-Type. Mr. Lincoln had the car modified for Ice Racing and campaigned it in Europe in several forms.

1955 Jaguar D-type front

In November 1966, chassis XKD 530, no longer competitive on Finland’s ice courses, was sold to English collector Nigel Moores, a historic racing enthusiast who owned a number of D-Types during his life. When the car arrived for him, it showed the symptoms of wear expected from such hard use, and the body had been modified to an open two-seater cockpit with a truncated tail. As rebuilding the original body was deemed to be too prohibitively expensive for a car of such value at that time, it was decided that the later D-Type construction manner, which involved separately bolting a front and rear chassis sub-frame to the monocoque body, afforded the opportunity to remove the damaged body and salvage as many original chassis components as possible.

Mr. Moores’ staff separated the chassis tub, mounted all-new bodywork in the factory long-nose style, and fitted the car with the wide-angle headed D-Type engine that had originally been used by the Cunningham team. The separated monocoque body, the original engine, and the gearbox were put aside and eventually sold, around 1984, to historic racer John Harper, who repaired the coachwork and mounted it on an all-new chassis that mostly consisted of various original Jaguar factory components.

1955 Jaguar D-type interior

As both resulting cars were stamped with the XKD 530 chassis number, a controversy gradually emerged as to the proper identity of each car and as to which was, in fact, the authentic original car. Ole Sommer, a D-Type owner and the proprietor of Sommer’s Veteranbil Museum in Denmark, eloquently summarized the situation; “It seems difficult to rectify the situation, unless some benevolent person should decide to purchase both cars and exchange the front sub-frames and the legal documents, resulting in only one single car claiming to be XKD 530.”

1955 Jaguar D-type hood

This is essentially the path that the previous owner followed after acquiring one car in 1998 and the other in June 2002. The consignor delivered both cars in late 2002 to Chris Keith-Lucas’s well-regarded CKL Developments in East Sussex. When disassembling both cars, CKL carefully noted the individual part numbers, and after comparing them to original factory parts numbering that had been supplied by a long-time D-Type expert, the parts were separated and color-coded to distinguish which were original to XKD 530 and those used as replacements in either of the two vehicles.

1955 Jaguar D-type

It was presented at RM/Sotheby’s Amelia Island sale in racing livery, with Dunlop centerlock alloy wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, dual wraparound Plexiglas windscreens, 4-point belts, RetroTrip rally odometer, SINN stopwatch and clock, three Salter digital timers, and a driver’s head fairing. It was in great useful condition at Amelia, with noted experts Gary Bartlett and Terry Larson both concurring. Sold by Christie’s in London in June 2002 for $517,979 while there were still two claimants to the chassis number, then sold after rectification by RM at Monterey in 2013 for $3,905,000. It left the RM Sotheby’s Amelia auction block unsold but closed post-block at $3,340,909 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,675,000 – surely an excellent deal on a D-type that is eligible for, and has participated in, many desirable events including four runs in the Mille Miglia Storica.

1956 Chevrolet Cameo Pickup

Although the 1956 Chevrolet Cameo was destined by price to never be a high volume seller, it is of crucial historical importance, bringing passenger-car styling elements into the truck world for the first time in a serious way. Today, every truck collector in the world would love to own a sweet Cameo.

56 Chevrolet Cameo

Chevy stepped up in the mid-1950’s, developing light truck with a “Modern Design for Modern Hauling.” Forward-slanting windshield pillars on the “Panoramic” wraparound windshield combined with a new upper cab structure, hooded headlamps and shapely wheel openings to form an all-new profile. Suddenly, trucks weren’t just for work anymore. Though the Cameo’s pickup box was a standard item, fiberglass rear fenders were built in the Corvette plant and broadened it to the same width as the front end, producing a smooth flow-through look. Chuck Jordan, former head of GM Design, earned credit for the design, a precursor to many generations of Chevy trucks.

1956 Chevrolet Cameo engine

  • 350 ci V-8 engine,
  • 250 HP,
  • 700-R overdrive automatic transmission,
  • independent front suspension,
  • rear semi-elliptic leaf springs,
  • 114” wheelbase

 

Much like Chevy’s cars of the day, the Cameo sported an eggcrate grille, wraparound front bumper, and a third more glass than the previous 3100 Series. The interior also was more car-like — particularly the dashboard, which featured a fan-shaped speedometer and needle gauges, with a top finished in textured black to cut down on reflections. Even standard models had breathable two-tone upholstery, and the Cameo had a new frame, longer leaf springs, wider track, and a two-inch-shorter, 114-inch wheelbase.

1956 Chevrolet Cameo side

The Cameo we photographed in Houston is simply stunning in Bombay Ivory with Red accents throughout, with the 2-tone motif extending from the bed to the art-deco dash. The paint and bodywork is impeccable, with crisp paint lines, fresh trim bits, and excellent panel gaps. Even the rubber trim and glass are in as-new condition, with the chrome and all polished fittings following suit.

1956 Chevrolet Cameo interior

The bed of this truck is just as nice, with the original wood highlighted by a vibrant red bed and those hand laid-up white fiberglass fenders that caused such a stir. The smooth tailgate and ultra-cool rear end may not have been designed for farm use, but today, this truck-in-a-tuxedo is prized for its landmark design and upscale image. Driving the finest “gentleman’s pickup” from the 50’s is quite an experience, but this fine Cameo takes it over the top, providing the owner with unique style and great road manners to proudly enjoy.

1956 Chevrolet Cameo rear